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A Century Ahead

One hundred years ago, a small faith-based ministry sparked a revolution for social justice, innovation, and health care for all. When Bon Secours Hospital was first built, the Sisters of Bon Secours could not have imagined where their humble beginnings would lead. But over the past century, and in the century ahead, the sisters and their lay co-workers, through the Holy Spirit and through pure determination and grit, remain in Baltimore, continuing to offer Good Help to Those in Need®.

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The Revolution Begins

Imagine three young sister nurses saying goodbye to their loved ones, not knowing if they would see them again, and sailing from Paris to the U.S. The year: 1881. The mission: to care for the poor, sick, and dying in their homes. While 2019 marks the 100th anniversary of Bon Secours’ first hospital in America, the celebration requires a step back to 1881 to put the sisters’ model of care into context.

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The real legacy of Bon Secours is greater than clinical care. To honor the centennial celebration of Bon Secours’ first hospital in America, we invite you to learn from and experience our early—and still little known—revolutionary model of care. Discover our extraordinary 100 years of caring and what’s to come in the century ahead.

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Inspired by God's Healing and Compassion

Called on by God and inspired by His mercy, the Sisters of Bon Secours care for the sick, pray for the dying, comfort the lonely, listen and respond to the cries of the poor and aged, and advocate against injustice. They alleviate their suffering and bring them a message of hope and assurance that there is a God who loves them.

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Born at Bon Secours

Before the maternity wing closed in 1974, Bon Secours was the premier place for Catholic women to give birth. Every day, we hear from people who were born here, who have memories to share. Though we no longer deliver babies at the hospital, the stories and sense of community among these “Bon Secours babies” live on.

I'M A BON SECOURS BABY